Online Calculus I     Information    

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• Active forum • Flexible  
•HD video lecturesnew downloadable and playable on smart phones and ipads
Transfer academic credit to your university
4 semester units, summer 2016, 8 weeks, June 20- August 12,
fully online, flexible Calculus I - MATH 226
12 years of verifiable track record serving hundreds of students annually
Calculus class online with video lectures, active forum & personal help

Prerequisites Syllabus
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As of May 27 you can still enroll by calling us 415 405 7700, select option 5. Students from other universities and international students are most welcome. Please note: the class is fully online, you can be anywhere with an interent access. However, the comprehensive final examination will be proctored at your location via a video link or at SFSU.

This is the future - recent article about this this class and the professor.
Department of Mathematics, San Francisco State University (SFSU), 1600 Holloway Avenue, San Francisco, CA 94132. SFSU is accredited by Western Association of Schools and Colleges (WASC).
What are the students who succeeded in this online calculus class say and what advice they offer?
A student with different learning needs, summer 2015 Thank you again for welcoming me into calculus I, and thank your staff for always being there for me. Having learning differences isn't easy, as this class required full commitment and persistency. I was immediately accommodated by you, and your staff never let me down. Although this course seemed almost impossible torward the beginning, your staff always guided me in the right direction and gave me the confidence I needed. I was shy in the beginning to even comment on Piazza, but took it upon myself to open up to everyone and start interacting about questions and concerns with the homework. Overall, I remember the day when I was on the edge about joining this class considering, like you said, it is very hard to just jump in! For someone like me who started at lesson 7 and succeeded since due to my dedication, I am proud to say I ended with an A. I learned that although this course was one of the most intense courses I've ever involved myself in, anything is possible with a little bit of faith. I couldn't ask for a better calculus course to be apart of!
A UCSD studentI just wanted to say thank you. I went on to complete second semester calc,multivariate,linear algebra and differential equations at UCSD. Received A's in all my courses because this course really gave me a solid foundation.
Jonathan in the process of applying to Boston University, College of Engineering, fall 2010 I want to thank you for the obvious amount of effort, enthusiasm, and organization that you put into making this class possible. Without your devotion to the subject and desire to teach the material, I feel I would not have been able to do this subject online. Many people commented,"Wow, really, calculus online? Isn't that going to be difficult?" Admittedly, I gave some wieght to thier comments, but enrolled anyway. I worked hard, but all of the details were laid out, and it was clear what needed to be done in order to succeed. This was by no means an easy class for me to complete, as I am also working full time and enrolled in a graduate degree program, but it was very much worth it. Because of this class experience, I feel that I have a solid understanding of the foundations of calculus, am able to see thier applications in the real world, and will be able to move forward in understanding of mathematics in my future academic and professional career. It was a bit unnerving to start an online class in calculus, but you made it challenging, interesting, and rewarding without making it intimidating. And for that, I thank you. Good luck in the coming semester!
Dustin, spring 2010 Thanks for a great semester. The structure of the class is fantastic. I've never seen an online class have as many notes, opportunities for collaboration, and assistance as yours. It's definitely one of a kind (in a fantastic way). It required hours of time for homework, but that's expected. I was just happy to be able to understand the homework in a beneficial way. Were it not for the fantastic structure of the class (say, one that relies strictly on a textbook without relevant notes), I would have struggled to understand anything.
Another student. Thank you for such a wonderful opportunity. I finally enjoyed learning math. It was a great adventure and I am grateful to have the opportunity to participate in this experience. I also like to say thank you to your staff (...) for the support we received even very late at night and for the fast responses. I will definitely recommend this course to all, even those who are a student, a father and working at the same time. I would have signed up for an online math 227 if there was such an opportunity, but to my knowledge it is not available. Maybe not yet! Again, thank you very much and wish you a great summer.
Elisabeth, senior, double-major in Cell & Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, SFSU, Fall 2007 1. What was the main reason you took the online Calculus course rather
than a regular class?
I took the online class to have a flexible study schedule and to experience a fully online class for the first time.

2. What was the key to your success in this course? The keys to my success in this class were keeping up with the homework and spending as much time as I could online speaking with other students - either through the iLearn message board or via an instant messaging program.

3. Who in your opinion would be a good student likely to succeed in this class format?  Who, in your opinion, would not be a good
candidate?
Likely to succeed : someone who has a really good foundation in precalculus, is a "self-starter" - someone who can work independently if necessary, someone who can work with others cooperatively, and someone who knows when they need assistance and asks for it ASAP. Not a good candidate : someone with a weak understanding of precalculus (especially algebra and trigonometry), a person who needs a lot of structure to do well, and someone who has a tendency to procrastinate.

4. What advice would you offer to a potential student? Watch the lecture videos as soon as they're available; spend at least 12 hours a week altogether on the class (including studying, watching lecture videos, chatting with others, posting Q/A to the message board, interacting with the instructor and TA, etc); do the homework on time (I suggest doing ALL the assigned problems); take the opportunity to speak with the Professor (and TA) - he is very helpful and always responds to even the most mundane questions quickly; expect there to be a difference between the way you "do" this class versus normal lectures - use this experience for all it's worth.

5. Please add anything about the class and your experience: I would like to emphasize that there are weekly in-person office hours and also a lot of availability on the part of the instructor and TA online every week to assist you with any problems you may have. Take advantage of this. Also, don't forget to check Stream if you get stuck on homework problems; I found it to be quite useful and often so. Lastly, I'd like to add that I absolutely loved this course!


Amy May 2008 The most important thing about staying ahead in this class is doing each and every homework assignment and getting it in on time (or early). I didn't realize in the beginning how much time I was really going to be spending on doing homework. It did average out to about 12-14 hours per week though, as Prof. Goetz suggests. I am a procrastinator and because of other classes and work, I would often have to wait until the night before to do my homework. Now, this isn't the best option because cramming everything in all at once can lead to information overload and it's easier to grasp things over time. But, with real dedication and the willingness to stay up until 4am doing homework, it's still possible to do well in the class as I did. The forum was almost equally as important because it allowed me to do something I wouldn't be able to do in a normal in-person class, which is ask questions whenever I need to, like at 4am. Often, when I would go to the forum, someone else would have already asked the same question I had about a problem. But honestly, I probably would not have done so well in the class had I not truly enjoyed doing the homework, even when I was the most frustrated. Calculus can be a hard thing to grasp but finally understanding a problem gave me a small sense of accomplishment. Richard, May 2008
My advice is to stay on top of the lectures and assignments. Since you can watch the lectures at your convenience it is so easy to fall behind. Turn in your assignments early. Take advantage of the free points! Heck, you have to do the assignment eventually so why not do it early and get some free points! Utilize the forums. There is a lot of helpful hints and advice that saved me this semester. Ask questions - I know its a cliche but really...if you have a question there is most likely someone else that is asking the same thing. Answer questions - Not only are you helping a fellow student but if you give a wrong answer there will be someone else that can correct and explain what you did wrong. Don't rely on the websites to answer the derivatives for you. I fell into that trap and then I realized that I would not have any idea how to solve the problem because I became reliant on them. I am a Marine Biology Major and I really should have taken this class a long time ago. It would have especially helped me to understand some of those chemistry calculations from 2/3 years ago that I am just now finally getting what it was exactly that I was doing beyond just solving it. I definitely would recommend this class to future students from any major. One of the best math experiences I have had. And I DREAD math! big grin by Pei - May 2008
Since there's no in-class lecture for this math section, it is very important that you keep on track throughout the semester. Because i was not able to keep up with the lecture and the homework sets, i could see my homework grade went up and down, which was not so good. Therefore, i was forcing myself to do extra-good at the end of the semester because i knew i had to get more points to pass this class. The extra homework point for turning it early also helped me bring up my grades a little too! Overall, it had not been easy but thanks to the replayable video lectures and the unlimited help i got from the forum on ilearn, i survived. Actually, i thought i did pretty well at the end too! Although there's no in-class lecture, there are tutoring sessions on campus that you can get help from (if you really need some personal help). You can also feel free to e mail Professor Goetz or any of the TAs, they will be more than happy to help you out like they did to me. In conclusion, this has been a great experience for me. I appreciate this opportunity to take Calculus online because as a Biology major student who commute on a daily bases, i seriously do not have much time to take a regular math class. So i definitely recommend this class to people like me.

David - 20 May 2008, 07:42 PM The hardest part for me, as someone who hadn't taken a math class in more than 5 years, was adjusting at the beginning of the semester. It was easy for forgotten algebraic principles and equivalencies to get in the way of new concept learning in the beginning. I was a little nervous at first because the first few assignments were taking much longer than anticipated, but it became much more comfortable once the algebraic rust fell away. Do review algebra first! I got a great amount of information from the lectures and online forum, but I found it also helpful to reinforce those concepts by reviewing the corresponding textbook sections. The textbook is good for the general concept and formula checking, but when you have a more specific question just shoot it off to the forum and the feedback comes almost immediately. Trying to teach concepts in the forum to someone else, I also found, was really a great way to lock down new concepts. If you're doing your homework early and not many people are discussing your question on the forum yet, check the stream channel for short video clips (a huge collection) that can provide that one needed concept (or trick) to the problem. Another source for learning (you will see there are very many) are great links to math websites and even designated times to personally chat online, or call, teaching assistants about your questions. Procrastination will penalize you in this course. There were some homeworks that were considerably longer than others that required early starts for a good grade. Overall it was a great learning experience that was just very convenient. You could probably be a full time business traveler and still take the course. I feel much better about my math skills now. Before I took this course, a function was just an equation that was hard to evaluate without a graphing calculator. Simply a great class with a great professor and fellow students! by Arnold - Tuesday, 20 May 2008, 09:22 PM
How to succeed: Tip #1: Do not take this course over the summer unless you are...
a. Either very proficient with math (algebra and trigonometry);
b. Or you have a lot of time to devote to this class and all the homework. Tip #2: Regardless of your answer to #1, you must be willing to do a lot of work, including posting and sharing questions and answers. Tip #3: Really listen to the very first lecture where Dr. Goetz explains how Calculus came into being. That sets the stage for the entire course and its primary objective. Throughout (and especially In the middle) of the course, it is easy to lose sight of how the little concepts add up to something worthwhile or useful. Thinking back on the first lecture will help you see the bigger picture and might even give you the proper perspective to understand that troublesome derivative problem or that confusing integration problem. Seriously! Tip #4: Try on your own first. Active learning is the only way to pass the final exam! Tip #5: When tip #4 fails, use all the resources at hand: the homework forum, video excerpts of the lecture or similar problems, the grapher, external resources, even that expensive dry text book! Tip #6: When tip #4 works, take the time to give others tips or weigh in on questions posed by other students. This serves 2 purposes: it reinforces your learning and it builds your body of "postings" for that all-important class participation credit (which is worth an entire grade improvement)! Tip #7: Convince yourself that you love to solve all kinds of problems, including Calculus, even if that's not entirely true. If you can get into the spirit of things, you will have some measure of fun to help temper the frustration and make the long hours of doing homework less tedious. Tip #8: Dr. Goetz and his staff are the best and they are looking after your best interest: to learn and have an appreciation for Calculus. So trust them and don't be afraid to ask anything that would help you to make the most out of the class.
Enjoy and good luck!